parallax background

Ellie Gerszt

Senior Partnerships Executive

Ellie Gerszt

Senior Partnerships Executive

All in all, I’m a white, millennial, middle class Londoner but I’m also a Jewish, bisexual woman with Asperger’s syndrome. This super intersectional identity can be complicated at times, and often feels like it’s pulling me in different directions! But because I have a lot of privilege and my ‘difference’ is mostly hidden, I’m able to advocate and use my voice for good. And since I came out (in every sense of the term) I’ve had the space to become the best, most authentic version of myself, which feels kind of amazing.

The world still doesn’t always like, understand or accept those who are different. It can be easy to feel isolated, ashamed or like you need to hide parts of yourself. This makes it even more important to choose who you surround yourself with carefully. The people whose opinions I value see the real me: how hard I try, how much I care about being a positive person and yes, my flaws too. While they might not always understand me, they love and accept me for who I am. That means more than the casual cruelty and fear of others ever will.

I don’t look like anyone’s stereotype of a person with Asperger’s. I’m a chatty, outspoken woman (found more often than not in heels and make up) whose aptitude for STEM is minimal and works in a people centric role. So, I’d say: resist the temptation to stereotype, to put me or anyone else in a box. Just like with Neurotypicals, Asperger’s doesn’t look the same on everyone.

JOIN THE BIG PICTURE THINKERS

Over the coming weeks we're excited to introduce you to our 'Founding 50' Women Beyond the Box. Sign up to receive our full newsletter straight into your inbox.